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  • Staff

    Staff

    Donna Hassler, Director DHassler@SavingPlaces.org Gerard Blache, Superintendent of Buildings & Grounds GBlache@SavingPlaces.org 413-298-3579 x25236 Brian McElhiney, Buildings & Grounds Coordinator BMcElhiney@SavingPlaces.org 413-298-3579 x25228 Lisa Reynolds, Office Manager LReynolds@SavingPlaces.org 413-298-3579 x25210

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  • The Minute Man

    The Minute Man

    In the small town of Concord, Massachusetts, there stands one of the greatest icons of American art, dedicated one hundred years to the day after the Revolutionary War battle it commemorated. In 1872, a committee of citizens awarded a commission to create a monument commemorating the battle at the North Bridge to promising local sculptor Dan French (who was only 22 years old at the time). French, who had never executed a full-sized figure, jumped at the opportunity and agreed […]

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  • Lincoln Memorial

    Lincoln Memorial

    When Daniel Chester French began his life as a sculptor, the most famous American public monuments were portrait figures and equestrian statues, installed in the rotundas of public buildings and in parks.  The Lincoln Memorial, executed at the end of his career, reflects the expansion of the role of both the artist and architect.  Both figures had become dramatists of the nation’s core meaning, its most basic values, commitments, and memories. Each year, over four million visitors make the pilgrimage to the Lincoln […]

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  • The Continents

    The Continents

    Following the Spanish-American War (April-August, 1898), the vast territorial empire that was the United States extended from Cuba to the Philippines.  By the early 1900s, approximately three-quarters of all federal revenue came from customs duties, most of it through the bustling port of New York.  Sited in lower Manhattan, the scale and splendor of the U.S. Custom House (1900-07) symbolized the nation’s burgeoning international influence.  Like so many of the great projects of the American Renaissance, it told its story […]

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  • Samuel F. Dupont Memorial

    “A dry fountain is a pitiful spectacle…” – Daniel Chester French to the Commission of Fine Arts   In 1882, Congress authorized the creation of a statue honoring Civil War Admiral Samuel du Pont, to be located in a newly-fashionable neighborhood in the District of Columbia, not far from the White House.  The du Pont family, however, never liked the statue.  In 1917, in keeping with changing aesthetics, they hired French to replace the statue with a more “artistic” memorial. […]

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  • Daniel Chester French

    Daniel Chester French

      Daniel Chester French was born in Exeter, New Hampshire, on April 20, 1850, to a distinguished New England family.  He was the youngest of four children born to Henry Flagg French, a lawyer, judge and farmer, and his wife, Anne Richardson French. The Frenches were a supportive family that valued and nurtured Daniel’s artistic talent.  They also possessed a strong sense of family and of history, and, as a boy, Daniel took as his middle name “Chester,” after the name of […]

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  • French Added to The Met’s Timeline of Art History

    The Metropolitan Museum of Art has added a biography and timeline for Daniel Chester French to the Met’s timeline of Art History. This is an incredibly useful resource with links and images. Check it out!

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  • President Obama on Daniel Chester French

    President Obama spoke about Daniel Chester French during his remarks at the America’s Promise Alliance Education Event on March 1, 2010. The reference to French came at the end of the President’s speech: Now, there’s an old story that Colin [Powell] has told about a man named George Ellis, who lived about a hundred years ago. And George Ellis was a janitor. His job was to clean up after the artist Daniel Chester French. Some of you may have heard of French — he’s […]

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  • Remembering Margaret French Cresson

    Remembering Margaret French Cresson

    In honor of Women’s History Month, we fondly remember Daniel Chester French’s only child, Margaret French Cresson (1889-1973).  Born in Concord, Massachusetts, Peggy, as she was called by her family and friends, spent 77 years on her father’s country estate in Stockbridge.  Thanks to her foresight and generosity, Chesterwood is preserved as a museum and historic site today. Like her father, Peggy was an accomplished sculptor of bronze and marble busts, bronze reliefs, portrait heads and memorial plaques.  She studied under her father and later with Abastenia […]

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  • Lincoln Model Featured on NTHP’s Historic Sites Blog

    Lincoln Model Featured on NTHP’s Historic Sites Blog

    Daniel Chester French’s plaster working model for the Lincoln Memorial is highlighted in the new “Spotlight on Collections” feature of the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Historic Sites blog. Learn more about French’s six foot model of Abraham Lincoln, which is currently on loan to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. The model will be on view at Chesterwood beginning May 29, 2010.

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Daniel Chester French Sculptures (Flickr)

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Contact Us

Address:
4 Williamsville Road (physical address)
PO Box 827 (mailing address)
Stockbridge, MA 01262

Telephone: 413.298.3579
Extension 25218 for Admissions/Shop
Extension 25210 for additional tour information,
including group reservations

Fax: 413.298.1065
Email: chesterwood@savingplaces.org

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