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  • VIDEO: Home Movies (c 1925)

    VIDEO: Home Movies (c 1925)

    This six and half minute video encapsulates home movie footage taken of Daniel Chester French around 1925. Footage locales include Chesterwood, Laurel Hill, and various homes of nearby friends. Copyright of Chesterwood – a National Trust Historic Site (2012)

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  • VIDEO: Daniel Chester French: Sculpting an American Vision

    VIDEO: Daniel Chester French: Sculpting an American Vision

    This video was produced to illustrate the life and accomplishments of Daniel Chester French, through it we hope to provide a primer on this remarkable individual which will provide better context of why he built and resided at Chesterwood, in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, for half of the year.

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  • Timeline: Chesterwood Property (1896-Present)

    Timeline: Chesterwood Property (1896-Present)

    1897 Daniel Chester French (DCF) purchases property in Glendale, Massachusetts and begins renovation and design of summer home and studio called Chesterwood (his third and named after his father’s house in Chester, New Hampshire). Family usually lived at Chesterwood from May to October. 1897-8 Barn at Chesterwood relocated 1898 Studio at Chesterwood completed on former site of barn; work on formal garden underway.  Henry Bacon designs the studio, and it may have been one of his first commissions after leaving […]

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  • Timeline: Daniel Chester French (1850-1931)

    Timeline: Daniel Chester French (1850-1931)

    April 20, 1850 Born in Exeter, New Hampshire. 1869 Executes bust of his father, Henry Flagg French, and relief of his sister, Sarah Flagg French. March-April 1870 Works in studio of John Quincy Adams Ward. Winter 1871-2 Studies with William Rimmer. November 1873 Commissioned to execute Minute Man for town of Concord, Massachusetts. October 1874 Goes to Florence, Italy. Works in studio of Thomas Ball. April 19, 1875 Minute Man dedicated. August 1876 Returns from Italy. November 1876 Resides in […]

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  • Suggestions for Further Reading

    Suggestions for Further Reading

    Adams, Adeline.  Daniel Chester French: Sculptor.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1932. Craven, Wayne.  Sculpture in America.  New York: Thomas Y. Crowell Co., 1968; reprint ed., 1984. Cresson, Margaret French.  Journey into Fame: The Life of Daniel Chester French. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1947. Emmet, Alan.  So Fine a Prospect: Historic New England Gardens.  Hanover, NH, and London: University Press of New England, 1996. French, Mary Adams.  Memories of a Sculptor’s Wife.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1928. Gillette, Jane Brown.  Chesterwood.  […]

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  • Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Daniel Chester French Where is Daniel Chester French buried?  Where is his daughter, Margaret, buried? French is buried at Sleepy Hollow Cemetery in Concord, MA. Margaret is buried next to her husband, William Penn Cresson, in the cemetery of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Oaks, Pennsylvania, near Philadelphia. Sculpture  The infamous Abraham Lincoln/sign language story: According to many people, Lincoln’s hands appear to be in the sign language positions for the letters A and L.  This is a coincidence and […]

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  • The Minute Man

    The Minute Man

    In the small town of Concord, Massachusetts, there stands one of the greatest icons of American art, dedicated one hundred years to the day after the Revolutionary War battle it commemorated. In 1872, a committee of citizens awarded a commission to create a monument commemorating the battle at the North Bridge to promising local sculptor Dan French (who was only 22 years old at the time). French, who had never executed a full-sized figure, jumped at the opportunity and agreed […]

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  • Lincoln Memorial

    Lincoln Memorial

    When Daniel Chester French began his life as a sculptor, the most famous American public monuments were portrait figures and equestrian statues, installed in the rotundas of public buildings and in parks.  The Lincoln Memorial, executed at the end of his career, reflects the expansion of the role of both the artist and architect.  Both figures had become dramatists of the nation’s core meaning, its most basic values, commitments, and memories. Each year, over four million visitors make the pilgrimage to the Lincoln […]

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  • The Continents

    The Continents

    Following the Spanish-American War (April-August, 1898), the vast territorial empire that was the United States extended from Cuba to the Philippines.  By the early 1900s, approximately three-quarters of all federal revenue came from customs duties, most of it through the bustling port of New York.  Sited in lower Manhattan, the scale and splendor of the U.S. Custom House (1900-07) symbolized the nation’s burgeoning international influence.  Like so many of the great projects of the American Renaissance, it told its story […]

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  • Samuel F. Dupont Memorial

    “A dry fountain is a pitiful spectacle…” – Daniel Chester French to the Commission of Fine Arts   In 1882, Congress authorized the creation of a statue honoring Civil War Admiral Samuel du Pont, to be located in a newly-fashionable neighborhood in the District of Columbia, not far from the White House.  The du Pont family, however, never liked the statue.  In 1917, in keeping with changing aesthetics, they hired French to replace the statue with a more “artistic” memorial. […]

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Daniel Chester French Sculptures (Flickr)

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Address:
4 Williamsville Road (physical address)
PO Box 827 (mailing address)
Stockbridge, MA 01262

Telephone: 413.298.3579
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